1898 Recommendations for the Klondike

This is a section from the Official Guide to the Klondike put out in 1898.  It was well respected at the time and this section covers mainly food and clothing.  The food ration was purposely made about 50% high to allow for cold, hard work and some loss to conditions.  I thought it is an interesting piece and gives some insight to the problems one can face in a cold climate.

HowardGuide to the Klondike 1998

 

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5 Responses to 1898 Recommendations for the Klondike

  1. Ellen says:

    I found this informative and interesting.
    Looks much like what we have for our modern day supplies.
    This will go in my prep note book
    Thank you

  2. Matt in Oklahoma says:

    very interesting

  3. Ellen says:

    Went looking for compressed vegitables. Still do not know what they are but if what little I found seems they could be dehydrated or some other state then could have been mixed with whatever then compressed into blocks. Sounds define.
    Ran across this site
    The Authentic Campainer and this thread interesting reading. Civil War site.
    http://www.authentic-campaigner.com/forum/showthread.php?18135-Desiccated-vegetables

  4. angela says:

    Around August here in the south of Italy is time for San Marzano tomatoes, basically a juicy plum tomato that is used for making sauces. But these are also used for making dried tomatoes. Cut in half and are placed on a screen, sprinkled with salt on both sides(helps to pull out all liquids) and under full sun. Occasionally have to turn them over and repeat for a few days until they are dried but pliable. Bring them in at night, lest the humidity gets on them. Just keep an eye that no critters get to them.
    *side note–to put them sott’olio (in oil) rinse with vinegar, let dry, then hard pack in a hermetic jar, with your choice of spices and completely cover with olive oil. I use dried oregano, garlic slices, and hot pepper. But many here use dried mint leaves. Your choice. You can taste them before you put them in oil for salt because you had previously salted them during drying process. Let stand for a few weeks so that the flavors blend, occasionally turning jar over and letting all spices float around. Then they are ready to be used in cooking, and even eaten out of jar with a slice of fresh bread.
    Buon apetitto!

  5. It’s interesting to read something written over 100 years ago, describing items needed for survival. In the South, furs would even be helpful for the few very cold weeks we usually have.

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