Seasonal Allergies How Do You Treat Them After TEOTWAWKI

seasonal allergies

Every year about this time, I suffer from seasonal allergies.  Now mine get bad enough to turn into seasonal asthma.  This means that I have to take some form of medication to keep it from getting bad.  Now what about after TEOTWAWKI?

Having suffered from this for years, I have tried all different ways to control my allergies.  I have tried everything from herbs to modern medications, and have found a few things that really help.

First, there are several things that you can do to control seasonal allergies that do not require herbs or medications.

  • Stay out of the pollen as much as possible.  Pollen counts are normally the highest between 5 am and 10 am, so limiting your outside exposure during those times can be extremely helpful for diminishing your allergies.
  • Stay indoors as much as possible on windy days when the pollen is blowing about.
  • Wash your face and hands after you’ve been outside to remove pollen.  Also, change and wash clothes if they’ve been exposed to pollen.
  • Avoid line drying your clothes and bedding outdoors when the pollen count is high.
  • Wash your hair daily before going to bed.  This removes pollen from your hair and skin and keeps it off your bedding. Wash your bedding in hot, soapy water once a week.
  • If you have to work in the garden, wear a dust mask.  Get or make some old-fashioned cloth ones that you can wash and reuse.
  • If you have indoor pets, it is best if they have short hair and are brushed or washed regularly.  Pets carry in pollen as well as produce dander, both of which you may be allergic too.

That is your first line of defense, the second of cause being medications.  Over the years, I have found several that work well for my seasonal allergies.

Stinging Nettle.  a good natural option, it acts similar to many of the drugs sold to treat allergies, but without the unwanted side effects of dry mouth and drowsiness.  Nettles are a common weed in many parts of the United States.  They actually inhibit the body’s ability to produce histamine.

The easiest way to take it is a freeze-dried extract of the leaves sold in capsules.  Studies have shown that taking about 300 milligrams daily will offer relief for most people, although the effects may last only a few hours.  You also can make your own tinctures or teas with stinging nettle. I have found that this helps me, but I have to take it several times a day.

Another herb that helps me a lot is Brigham Tea.  The following is a link to an earlier post I wrote on this herb  Uses of Brigham or Mormon tea.  Brigham tea drank a couple of times a day does wonders for my seasonal allergies.

Now I have also gone the prescription medication route.  It was not a good decision for me.  I took a nasal spray that work great; there was only one problem, side effects.  Avoid any nasal spray that contains steroids, if you read the fine print on the warnings you will find that they cause cataracts and glaucoma.  I used them for years and have had cataract surgery and my optician tells me I am a candidate for glaucoma.

My current doctor and I have talked about medications for allergies quite a bit and he has done some research for me.  He has suggest that I try a non-prescription medication that is easy available and cheap.  It is cetirizine hydrochloride or generic Zyrtec 10 mm tablets.  It seems to work well for me.

I buy it at Costco under the name Aller-Tec and a year’s supply of 365 tablets costs $15.99.  Since I only take them when the allergy season is at its worst this is several years supply for me.  Now you are probably wondering why I don’t use herbs all the time?  Sometimes the herbs don’t always work and I need the extra boost.  Also after a major emergency, the right herbs may be hard to get.  The pills are inexpensive and help me when I need it.

One thing I want to add, I always have more to learn, if anyone has a good idea for herbal remedies, please let me know.  I will try them; I always like to learn more.  Also I am not a Doctor and can’t give medical advice, please check with your Doctor, before you try any of these remedies.

Howard

 

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4 Responses to Seasonal Allergies How Do You Treat Them After TEOTWAWKI

  1. I find caffeine and very hot showers provide some relief for my hay fever.

    My daughter only finds relief for her allergies with Claritin D…which thanks to the ‘penalize the good for the behaviors of the bad’ regulations is only available in 10 round packets…means we have to travel to a pharmacy weekly and wait in line at the pharmacy, show ID and pay cash (because the ACA doesn’t let us buy over the counter meds with our cafeteria plan any more)…pain in the behind!

  2. Arthur X says:

    One of my favorite solutions is a netti pot. Also useful for treating sinus infections and nasal blockages.

  3. Jackie says:

    A Nettie Pot is a life saver. Works better than just about anything. Just remember to NEVER use tap water with it. Always use bottled water, distilled water is the best choice.

  4. JayJay says:

    I have had horrendous allergy problems since the 70s.
    The greatest thing for me that works, doesn’t make me drowsy, and is economical is the DG generic brand—daytime.
    24 tablets for $2.50. I keep a shoe box full because during allergy season, they are scarce.

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