Preparedness should be a life style.

Preserving your own foods equals good nutrition products that you can trust for a reasonable price.

I know people whos idea of preparedness is to buy a one-year supply of food from some company, stack it in the corner of their garage and figure they are prepared.  I do not believe this is true preparedness.  They probably have never tasted the food and are not aware of its calorie count.  Some will be surprised at how quickly they are hungry.  Now I will admit that they will be better off than the majority of the population.

To me, preparedness means that you should use the foods and other preps on a regular basis.  My breakfast today was a multigrain cooked cereal.  It EMP struck today, my breakfast tomorrow would be the same.  We use our stored foods in our regular diet.  A while back, as an experiment we went over a month without going shopping and did not notice much difference in our diet.

Now I am not saying that in case of a major disaster our life could not be disrupted.  What I am saying is that the more preparedness is a part of your life the less the disruption will affect you.  You will develop skills that help you overcome the problems you will face.  Don’t just buy preps; stack them in the corner and plan to learn how to use them after the disaster.  Do something to better your position every day.

This does not require a lot of money or even time if you make preparedness a part of your life.  Dehydrating and preserving food, we get for nothing saves us a lot of money.  Skills can be often learned for free and the materials scrounged.  Make preparedness a part of your life now, before you need to.

Howard


Comments

Preparedness should be a life style. — 5 Comments

  1. When you stop learning you become irrelavant in life. Living the lifestyle makes you train and do which allows you to learn keeping you where you need to be

  2. Totally agree with living the lifestyle of taking care of ones self in an emergency. We shop from our pantry all month and then replenish what we’ve used … plus one extra … and if possible, something we don’t have. Dehydrating is our lifestyle. We’ve let all our friends know we save money this way, so anytime they have something that’s “going south” they call us to come get it. We’re always on the lookout at local pantries to see if they have any “freebies” sitting out and manage to snag something now and then…if…we can beat the hords :-) We don’t can because we don’t have the knowledge or the room. We also garden in season.

    • Make the room, WE2, and the knowledge can be acquired far easier than you can imagine. If you can follow directions enough to bake a cake out of a box, you can learn to can your own food. And when you have surplus from your garden, you get to save it for a cold winter’s day.

      My wife and I show folks how to can all the time, we love helping out. We figure every person we assist in becoming more self reliant is one less person to come knocking on our door if things get bad. We are happy to teach anyone that asks.

      Peace,
      db

  3. There have been several times when work has slowed down for me (I’m self employed, no work = no money), and we lived for months at a time from our preps.

    Growing up in the backwoods of West Virginia, my folks were prepared for long term outages of all kinds, and taught me to do the same. We were preppers and never even knew it.

    Peace,
    db

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