Tag Archives: acorns

10 Ways to have Hidden Gardens

hidden gardensGardening is a great way to supplement your food storage. In a post-TEOTWAWKI world, though, there’s the possible problem that your neighbors or other people may see it. That could pose a real danger. Hidden gardens are the solution. Gardens are not as hard to hide as you may think, and if you’re wondering how that could be possible, the author of this book spells out in detail how anyone can grow their own hidden garden. One easy advantage that we all have is that in today’s world, most people have no idea what many edible plants look like.

The first idea that most people come up with is to hide their garden behind a tall fence and a locked gate.…

Read More...
Posted in food storage, gardening | Tagged , , , , , | 1 Comment

Acorn Grubs are Good To Eat

acorn

Here you can see a Grub on an acorn

A while back I wrote three post on cooking with acorns.  Cooking with Acorns is easy,  Uses of Acorns and Acorns.  These articles show you how to cook with acorns and some of their other uses. Besides being edible, the tannic acid you wash out of the acorns is useful.

Tannic water is antiviral and antiseptic.  It can be used as a wash for skin rashes, skin irritations, burns, cuts, abrasions and poison ivy or poison oak.  If you have a sore throat you can even gargle with tannic water or use it as a mild tea for diarrhea and dysentery.  …

Read More...
Posted in edible plants | Tagged , | 1 Comment

Uses of Acorns

acorn4The Native Americans used acorn flour to make a type of flat bread, mush and soups.  Acorn flour makes unleavened bread since it has no gluten.  It can be used to make leavened bread, but must be mixed 50/50 with wheat flour.

Since acorn flour is high in oil it needs to be stored carefully and not be allowed to go rancid.  Acorns in the whole shell will keep for several years if properly stored.  Protect them from insects and varmints.

The tannic acid that is leached out has several uses.  Tannic acid makes a good laundry detergent.  However, it will color whites temporarily a slightly tan color.…

Read More...
Posted in cooking, medical, survival | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Acorns

Acorns are quite nutritious. For example, the nutritional breakdown of acorns from the white oak is 50.4%carbohydrates, 34.7% water, 4.7% fat, 4.4.% protein, 4.2% fiber, 1.6% ash. A pound of shelled acorns provides 1,265calories, and roughly 100 grams of oil.  During World War II Japanese school children collected over one million tons of acorns to help feed the nation as rice and flour supplies dwindled.

Oaks are very common growing over most of the US.  In my area, the Native Americans depended heavily on them for a food source.  I have been experimenting with acorns for several years.  There is a definite learning curve; you need to learn to cook with them now, and not when you are hungry.…

Read More...
Posted in food storage, survival | Tagged , , | 1 Comment