Tag Archives: beans

Beans can Replace Fat and Oils in Your Baking

beans

This is something that we posted a couple of years ago, but works so well that I think it deserves a to be put up again.  My wife has been using beans instead of fat in baking for about a year now.  The taste and textures amazes most people when we tell them what is used.  The cake cooks just a bit faster than normal, so be sure and watch close the first time you cook with them.  The cake stays moist longer.
There are two easy ways to replace fat with beans in most baking.

1. Simply cover beans with water and cook until very soft.  Mash until the beans are about the consistency of shortening.  You can use a blender.  Replace the fat in recipes cup for cup.  For example if a recipe calls for 1-cup margarine—use 1-cup mashed beans.  Liquid may be added to adjust the consistency.  Mashed beans do not keep long in the fridge, so use them or freeze them.

2. Grind the beans in your wheat grinder to make bean flour.  Store the flour in an airtight container.  Replace the fat in recipes cup for cup as above.  You will need to add extra liquid since the ground beans will be part of the dry ingredients.

Other types of beans will work, including canned beans.  The type of bean will have a slight effect on the taste.  White beans give it a slight vanilla taste.  The color of the bean should match the color of what you are baking.  For instants use black beans for chocolate cake.

I claim I can eat more because it makes a high protein low fat cake.  You do need to watch the type of beans you use, the other day; she went and grabbed a can of garbanzo beans, since they were open and she never wastes anything she used them.  Big mistake, even I had trouble eating it, and I can eat almost anything.  She now says use only white or black beans and I concur.

All said and done she is a great cook and you can’t go wrong following her recipes.  The use of beans in baking is one way of reducing the amount of oils you have to store.  Try it you will like it.

Howard

 

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Food Allergy’s, Gluten, and Various Grains and Bean Recipes

We were visiting our daughter awhile back in Utah and  as always we got started talking about storage and all the wheat our families have.  All of us think that with wheat we can survive an emergency because we can make different food items with wheat.

But as we got talking about different flours she told us about her sister in law and how she had been sick on and off for sometime with stomach problems. Now this person did all her cooking from scratch and all her baking. She has some wonderful bread recipes that we have shared with you. Well she finally went to the doctor and found out she had Celiac disease.

I think my husband has written about this before, but I am amazed how many children have similar allergies to wheat and other foods.  Parents keep their children inside so much now they have no resistance to germs. I have been reading about this more and more lately. No more cowboys and Indians, now its computers and hand held devices to keep them entertained

So my point is how many of you only have wheat storage and no other means of making flour out of grains? We did a video on milling different grains and beans and found that we are missing out using these resources on an everyday basis, even though we have many beans and other grains stored.  Many of you have tried using the bean flour we suggested and found you liked it. The families with children are going to be the hardest hit, if they don’t try using these foods before an emergency. We have this problem in our own family and I worry about it a lot.

So what are your children, grandchildren or our children going to eat? And don’t just say, if they are hungry enough they will eat anything, you might, but kids and the elderly are another story The food you will be fixing will not taste like that fast food take out you pick up on the way home because your too tired to fix dinner, so plan ahead and see what they are allergic too now before it’s to late.

Try this recipe and don’t tell anyone you used garbanzo flour; this recipe only serves one 12 inch pizza, so you can use different items on the pizza according to their likes

Chickpea Flour Pizza

  • 2/3 cup garbanzo flour
  • 1/3 tsp salt
  • ½ cup water
  • ½ tsp, rosemary finely chopped
  • 3 tbsp virgin olive oil
  • 2 tbsp chopped tomatoes
  • 1 tbsp onion, finely chopped
  • 3 tbsp parmesan cheese, grated or packaged
  • ¼ tsp black pepper
  1. Preheat the broiler or oven.
  1. Sift the flour with salt into medium bowl.
  1. Slowly add ¼ cup of water, stirring constantly to form a paste.  Beat with a wooden spoon until smooth.  Stir in the remaining ¼ cup water and let the batter stand at room temperature for 30 minutes.
  1. Stir in the rosemary.
  1. Heat 1 tbsp of olive oil in a 12-inch nonstick pan or cast iron frying pan.
  1. Stir the batter once, pour into the skillet and drizzle the remaining 2 tbsp of olive oil to cover top.
  1. Cook the pizza over moderately high heat until bottom is golden and crisp. Cook 2-3 minutes, until top is almost set. Burst any big bubbles with tip of knife.
  1. Sprinkle on the topping of your choose or use the one in the recipe. Place skillet under broiler and cook pizza for 4-5 minutes until golden and crisp.
  1. Slide onto platter or counter and slice.
We will be posting more bean and various grain flour recipes in the future.

Preparedness Mom

 

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Cooking with Bean Flours

Since our blog on grinding grains with the Wonder Mill Junior, I have been thinking about all the different legumes that can be used for flour.  Storing whole beans is as easy as storing whole wheat and can be used as flour. Whole beans store much longer than ground flour.

Today, bean flours are used primarily by people that need to be gluten free, so we don’t hear much about them.  We have a friend that has celiac disease, so we try to cook things for her that is gluten free. When I looked for gluten free items in the store, I almost fainted, the price for cookies, bread and several others items I checked were really expensive.

Since bean flour can be used for people with gluten problems or merely for a change in taste, we have included a bean flour biscuit recipe.  In the future we will post one for tortilla wraps as soon as I get a chance to try it.

Bean Flour Biscuits

  • 2 cups bean flour
  • 3 teaspoons baking powder
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ¼ cup unsalted butter soft (not melted)
  • ¾ cup skim milk

Mix dry ingredients. Add butter; mix til blended. Add milk, stir well, you may need more flour to be able to handle the dough. Roll out until about ¼ inch thick and cut with an upside glass, doughnut cutter or just form them by hand.

Bake on a greased cookie sheet for 12-15 minutes in a 450 oven.

Bean flour can be used for baking, thickener and for dips. You can also use for a filling for a dairy-free lasagna filling.

Here is a list of some of the bean flours.

  • Black Beans
  • Fava Beans
  • Garbanzo Beans
  • Green Pea Flour
  • Soy Flour
  • White Beans
  • Cranberry Beans
  • Canario Beans (they are creamed colored)

You can make flour from all of these beans just by grinding them with a good quality hand crank mill.  Check and make sure your mill will grind beans without being damaged.  Beans that are so old that they will not soften when cooked can be ground into flour and still used.  As always we would like to hear your comments and questions.

Preparedness Mom

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The Different Varieties of Beans

Cranberry beans sometimes called shell beans

My husband wrote an article recently about using beans instead of oil.  Well that got me to thinking about beans and how healthy they are.  Needless to say there are many people out there that can’t handle beans for one reason or another.  But maybe with the variety of beans out there you can find one that you would like.

Last year if you remember I took a trip to a bean warehouse, you’re going, right a bean warehouse.  Well, my friend and I traveled some distance to a small town over a bridge and thru farm lands and finally we find one large warehouse next to a river in the middle of no where.  I heard about this place from someone we were talking to somewhere. We get a lot of information this way; my husband can talk the wallpaper off a wall.

Any ways here is a list of beans I found out there for our eating pleasure.  I have tried the cranberry bean and the canario bean and I just made a batch of canario beans with the ham bone I saved from Thanksgiving.

Here’s a list of other beans the warehouse has:

  • Canario bean kidney shaped cream colored
  • Cranberry bean kidney shaped beige colored with little red lines
  • Baby lima Beans
  • Dark Red kidney bean
  • Light Red kidney bean
  • Blackeye beans
  • Jackson Wonder beans (not sure what they look like)
  • Black beans
  • White beans
  • Garbanzo beans
  • Pinto beans

There are a lot more varieties out there I’m sure, but these are the most popular ones we use.  Some restaurants have salad bars with a variety of beans you can try to see which ones you like before buying a large amount.

The canario beans I made with a ham bone, onion, carrots and a little celery for flavor plus salt, pepper, garlic, and a ¼ or less tsp of habanero chili.  Put everything in the pot and cook until the beans are soft and meat is falling off the bone.  I wash the beans, but don’t soak them before adding all the ingredients to the pot for cooking. This way the meat from the bone has plenty of time to fall off and the beans don’t end up being mushy. Then sit back and enjoy.

Preparedness Mom

P.S

The cranberry and canario beans are great tasting.  They could help add variety to your preps.  The cranberry beans are fast becoming my favorite.

Howard

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More on Using Beans as a Substitute for Oil in Baking

With the holidays aproaching and all the baking, I though I would mention this again.  Over the last year or so, my wife has written about using beans instead of oil in baking.  Well I can testify to you that it has worked great.  The baked goods taste normal, but stay moist longer.  She has used white beans and black beans depending on the color of the baked good she is cooking.  The following is a link to the original article that she wrote on how to do it. Using Beans Instead of Fat in Baking

Since then she has baked all kinds of things using black and white beans with great success.  I claim I can eat more because it makes a high protein low fat cake.  That is until the other day; she went and grabbed the wrong kind of beans.  By mistake, she opened a can of garbanzo beans, since they were open and she never wastes anything she used them.  Big mistake, even I had trouble eating it, and I can eat almost anything.  She now says use only white or black beans and I concur.

All said and done she is a great cook and you can’t go wrong following her recipes.  The use of beans in baking is one way of reducing the amount of oils you have to store.  Try it you will like it.

Howard

 

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A few basic facts about beans

 

Yield
1 c. of dry = 21/2 to 3 c. cooked beans

Bean : water ratio
1 c. beans : 4 c. water

Soaking beans
Slice a bean in half. If the center is opaque, soak more.

Are they cooked?
A bean is fully cooked when you can mash it with a fork.

Buying beans

  • Good beans: smooth and bright.
  • Old bean: cracked seams, dull, wrinkled. (The older the bean, the longer the cooking time.)

Most difficult beans to digest:
navy, lima, whole cooked soybeans

Easiest beans to digest:
Anasazi, adzuki, black eyed peas, lentils and mung

A method to help soften old beans and speed up the cooking is as follows:  First, sort and rinse the beans.  Bring three cups of water to boil for each cup of beans.  Add the beans to the boiling water and bring to a rolling boil for two minutes.  Take the beans off the stove.  Next, add 3/8 teaspoon of baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) for each cup of beans, cover and soak for 1 hour or more.  Extra baking soda may be required for older beans.  Drain and rinse the beans thoroughly.  Cover the beans with water and bring to a boil, then reduce the heat and simmer 1-2 hours or until tender.  Do not add salt or other ingredients until the beans have softened adequately

Howard

 

 

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Using Beans Instead of Fat in Baking

white beansMy wife has been using beans instead of fat in baking for about a year now.  The taste and textures amazes most people when we tell them what is used.  The cake cooks just a bit faster than normal, so be sure and watch close the first time you cook with them.  The cake stays moist longer.

There are two easy ways to replace fat with beans in most baking.

1. Simply cover beans with water and cook until very soft.  Mash until the beans are about the consistency of shortening.  You can use a blender.  Replace the fat in recipes cup for cup.  For example if a recipe calls for 1-cup margarine—use 1-cup mashed beans.  Liquid may be added to adjust the consistency.  Mashed beans do not keep long in the fridge, so use them or freeze them.

2. Grind the beans in your wheat grinder to make bean flour.  Store the flour in an airtight container.  Replace the fat in recipes cup for cup as above.  You will need to add extra liquid since the ground beans will be part of the dry ingredients.

Other types of beans will work, including canned beans.  The type of bean will have a slight effect on the taste.  White beans give it a slight vanilla taste.  The color of the bean should match the color of what you are baking.  For instants use black beans for chocolate cake.

Howard

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How to cook Beans the Old Fashioned Way

 

Since I was raised on a ranch, I pretty much watched my grandmother cook many different ways depending on the weather and how many men she had to cook for.  There was always a pot of beans cooking on the wood stove inside or over an open fire outside and fresh tortillas.  Any body that stopped by was always asked if they had eaten.

Ranch work is long hours and hard work, so she always had food ready.  Most was stuff that could be reheated quickly or was already heated waiting for the men to eat.  Some of the other dishes were Chile Verde, meat in tomato sauce; chicken cooked either Indian style with curry or Mexican stew.

pinto beansPinto beans or pink beans were her favorite.  They bought the beans in 50# bags and they called them dirty beans.  She would then sort out the dirt pebbles and rocks before cooking.  They were cheap to buy and easy to fix.

Because you can buy almost everything in a can now, there are many people out there that don’t know how to cook beans.  Here is a method she used.

Large cast iron pot
Sort through the beans, checking for rocks and dirt
4 cups beans either pink or pinto
Soak them overnight or pour boiling water on beans and let soak for two hours
Rinse the beans and refill with 6 to 12 cups cold water
Make sure the beans are covered and have room to boil.
Add 1 medium onion chopped
Cook for about 1 to 2 hours. When tender and almost done add seasonings
Salt and garlic to taste
2 tbsp, Chile Powder or 1 tbsp cumin
Add ¼ cup Bacon grease or 1 med ham hock

Cook until beans are done.  She made refried beans from this pot.

Put the beans in a frying pan with a little bacon grease or oil.  I use about 4 cups of beans. Cook them until they are warm and mash with potato masher.  Add Monterey jack cheese, about 1 cup, less if you use less beans.

Make plenty of tortillas to eat with the beans however you serve them.  This is an easy meal to make on camping trips and is very filling.  You can also take any leftover hamburger, steak, chicken or pork and roll in tortilla with the beans, like a burrito.

If you want to cook just plain beans for salads or casseroles, leave the chili powder, bacon grease and cumin out of recipe.  See the previous post on cooking old beans.

Preparedness Mom

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Softening Old Beans

All beans, even when they are correctly stored, become harder over time and take more time to cook.

A method to help soften beans and speed up the cooking is as follows:  First, sort and rinse the beans.  Bring three cups of water to boil for each cup of beans.  Add the beans to the boiling water and bring to a rolling boil for two minutes.  Take the beans off the stove.  Next, add 3/8 teaspoon of baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) for each cup of beans, cover and soak for 1 hour or more.  Extra baking soda may be required for older beans.  Drain and rinse the beans thoroughly.  Cover the beans with water and bring to a boil, then reduce the heat and simmer 1-2 hours or until tender.  Do not add salt or other ingredients until the beans have softened adequately

Howard.

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How Much Food do You Need for a Year

A question that comes up regularly is how much food is a year’s supply.  One answer is a list put out by the LDS Church (Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints).

  • Grains (wheat, rice, corn or other cereal grains) 300 lbs per person.
  • Nonfat dry milk 75 lbs per person
  • Sugar or honey 75 lbs person
  • Salt 5 lbs per person
  • Fats or oil 20 lbs per person
  • Dried legumes (beans, peas or lentils) 60 lbs per person
  • Garden seed

The above list will supply approximately 2300 calories per day.  This list is a bare bone survival list.  Appetite fatigue would be a problem if you had to depend only on these foods. Most people don’t know how to cook with such a limited variety. Other problems you would have to watch for are allergies to wheat. Some authorities believe that as much as 40% of the popular have wheat allergies.

Corn

If you depend heavily on corn, you need to treat it correctly or you can develop pellagra from a lack of vitamin B.  The American Indians treated corn with wood ash or lime to release the B vitamin niacin to prevent this.

Framework

I look at this list and consider it a framework to build upon.  The initial list is reasonably inexpensive and is good for long term storage, if correctly packed (except for the fats – oils, 20 – 30 years).  Get the items mentioned on the list or a good portion of them and then supplement it with spices, freeze dried, dehydrated foods, canned foods and your home production (foods you can produce at home, garden, chickens, eggs).

In the future we will show you recipes and methods that you can use to cook with the basic foods and produce good tasting meals that your family will enjoy.

Howard

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