Tag Archives: evacuation

7 Reasons to Bug Out in the First Wave

One of the more challenging decisions you may be faced with is when to bug out. A lot of us who consider ourselves seasoned preppers with a good number of survival skills might be tempted to wait until the last minute because we’re not convinced the situation is so dire that we couldn’t survive. Also, admit it, we don’t want to look foolish in front of our friends and neighbors if the crisis turns out to be a big, fat nothingburger.

However, if any of the following scenarios are a part of your life, it would be prudent to be in that first wave of people heading out of town.…

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8 Exit Plans Every Serious Prepper Should Have In Place

exit plans preppersMatt Drudge created a bit of a stir a couple of years ago with this Tweet:

drudge-exit-plan

I’ve been a Drudge Report reader for over 20 years and have often said a prayer of thanks for Matt’s consistent dedication to exposing corruption. That Tweet, though, that has been stuck in my head ever since I saw it. “Have an exit plan…”

As a prepper, I suppose I have a number of exit plans. Some are quite thorough and have become reality with marked up maps and a few bug out bags. However, Matt’s warning has recently caused me to think twice about my preparedness.…

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If You Have to Bug Out, Don’t Become a Refugee

refugee bug outThroughout history, refugees have always been a fact of life. Whether driven from their homes by weather, a natural disaster, war, persecution, or some other event that causes their homes to become more dangerous than hitting the road. In all cases, these people have come to realize they have no other choice.

In modern-day America, we’ve seen our share of refugees in such instances as Hurricane Katrina and Superstorm Sandy, but who knows what future events may cause you to decide your home is no longer a safe refuge. If that time ever comes, you’ll be glad you spent time thinking through your options and doing some planning for bugging out.…

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More on Your Evacuation Plan or Bugging Out

After writing a post on evacuation plans the other day (Planning Your Evacuation or Bug out Route). I received the following comments from a friend.  These are some additional points that you should take into consideration when planning an evacuation.

evacuation

Don’t be of these

Howard

Your Family Evacuation Plan Should Identify:

Start Point
Trigger
Destination
Route
Travel Mode
Supplies

Your starting point is home, work or school. If family members are at different places during the day, how will they communicate?

Discuss what your “triggers” might be. Do your own threat analysis. Hazmat release, house fire, flood or imminent hurricane landfall are more likely than nuclear war or space alien invasion.…

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Planning Your Evacuation or Bug Out Route

evacuation

Traffic jams, the first one to drive on the wrong side of the road may win.

Evacuating or bugging out is not at the top of my list of planned responses to a emergency.  I will stay in place until it becomes more dangerous to stay than to leave.  Now my plan like anyone else’s may change on the spur of the moment depending on the emergency.  So I always have a plan for bugging out.  Because I am getting old I am planning to use a vehicle if at all possible.

Many years ago I had a chance to review some of the old civil defense evacuation plans that were made during the cold war. …

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Posted in bugging out, Seventy-two hour kits, Transportation | Tagged | 4 Comments

Emergency Response Guidebook

A book that you should have if you live near a railroad, major highway or industrial area is the Emergency Response Guidebook.  This is a guidebook for first responders in any type of hazardous materials incident.  The book provides the codes to read the diamond shaped plaques that are located on the sides of vehicles carrying hazardous or dangerous materials.

It helps you to identify the material and provides you with information on health hazards, dangers of fire and explosion and evacuations distances.  With this book and a pair of binoculars, you can stand off at a distance read the plaques and identify the hazards. …

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