Tag Archives: oxygen absorbers

Oxygen Absorbers

I often see all types of questions on the use of oxygen absorbers and Mylar bags, so I thought it was time to write a blog addressing some of them.

I use a simple rule when I pack food in Mylar bags and buckets.  If it is a number 10 metal can or a one-gallon Mylar bag, I use a 300 cc oxygen absorber.  In all the packaging I write about, I will use the 300 cc O2 absorber.  The reason is I get them from an LDS cannery that is convenient for me, and that is the only size they carry. …

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Oxygen Absorbers: Getting the Most Out of Your Food Storage

Here is a guest post by Lee Flynn

Although it is impossible to predict what the future holds, there are certainly things that can be done to be as nearly prepared as possible. Emergency preparedness might require some investment (both in terms of time and money) but the piece of mind it brings is well worth the effort. And having the right supplies when disaster does strike is invaluable

Perhaps the most fundamental element of any emergency preparedness plan is acquiring food storage. Food storage can be expensive so it is best to build your supply gradually. It is also important that you take the necessary steps to ensure that the food storage you do buy will stay good for as long as possible.…

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Desiccant Packs and Long Term Dried Food Storage

Desiccant Packs

I see many people on the web recommending the use of desiccant packs to control moisture in stored foods.  In over 40 years of storing food, I have never used one.  Our dried storage includes all types of grains, legumes, dehydrated foods, both home dried and commercial.  During this time, I have never had any foods damaged by moisture.

The whole trick is to make sure your products are dry before you package them.  Dehydrated fruits, vegetables and meats should be dried to the point that they break when bent.  Foods dried to this point and package properly (in moisture proof containers) should not need a desiccant. …

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Oxygen Another Enemy of Food Storage

Jars vacuumed sealed with a Food Saver.

Today I will write about how oxygen affects the shelf life of food.  Oxygen supports the growth of microorganisms and causes changes in color.  Aerobic bacteria and fungi are able to grow in a oxygen rich  environment.  It also lets insects thrive and feed on your food.  Removing the oxygen prevents these changes from happening and kills the insects.  This will greatly increase the shelf life of your food.

Currently there are three common methods to protect your long-term dry pack from the affects of oxygen, vacuum sealing, oxygen absorbers and fumigation with dry ice.…

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Answers to Questions About Oxygen Absorbers

Oxygen absorbers

Recently I have received some questions from some beginning preppers on what is an oxygen absorber and how you use it.

They are variations of a small bag filled with iron powder and a salt mixture.  When they are exposed to air, they immediately start to rust.  Rust is a form of oxidation and consumes oxygen.  The oxidation will remove the oxygen from sealed container.  The oxygen absorbers come in a Mylar bag or special plastic that does not breathe, and have to be protected from exposure to air.

Oxygen absorbers are completely safe, and are non-toxic. They do not create any harmful gases and do not affect the smell and taste of the food. …

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The Long term Bug Free Storage of Dry Foods

I see posts on the internet about preventing the growth of bugs in grains and other dry food storage.  One method that is widely mentioned is freezing your products for several days prior to canning.  I have been storing foods for over 45 years without bug problems, I have never used freezing to kill bugs. I have used bay leaves, CO2 and oxygen absorbers.  The other thing that I watch very closely is the moisture level in my dry products.  Moisture levels should be below 10%.  See the following post http://bit.ly/Q2huKz to learn how to determine moisture levels

Freezing dry goods can be an effective means of killing insects.  …

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Sealing Food in 5 Gallon Buckets

sealing food in five gallon buckets

Place food into buckets

The other day I had to seal some popcorn and millet in Mylar bags and five-gallon buckets.  It is quite easy.  Open the Mylar bag and put it in the bucket.  Fill the Mylar bag with your product to about two inches from the top of the bucket.  You will notice that the bag is a lot taller than the bucket, rather than cut of the excess I seal it right on the edge.  If I open the bucket to rotate the food this leaves me plenty of material to reseal the bag.

I use an old two-foot metal hand level and an electric iron to seal the bags. …

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Canning Dry Pack in #10 Cans

The other day my wife purchased some 25lb bags of split peas from Winco.  They were reasonably priced at about $12.00 a bag.  Since we wanted them for long term storage, I decided to can them in #10 cans.

I am going to walk you through the canning process.  The cans, lids and oxygen absorbers were purchased through our local LDS cannery.  When you purchase your oxygen absorbers you need to buy an oxygen absorber bag clip.  They are used to reseal the oxygen absorber bags.  They will not seal the bag for extended periods (see previous post on testing oxygen absorbers).…

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Testing Oxygen Absorbers

The other day I found some oxygen absorbers that had been shoved to the back of a cupboard and forgotten.  I think that they were about 3 or 4 years old.  They were sealed only with the temporary clips that are normally used for short periods during canning operations.  Being curious I decided to test them.

The normal way you test them is to tape them to the inside bottom of a quart jar.  The jar is then turned upside down in a pan of water.  Over the next 24 hours, the vacuum they create should cause the water to rise approximately 2 inch up into the jar.…

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