Category Archives: edible plants

Edible Wild Plants can Supplement your Food Storage

Knowing the common edible wild plants in your area is always a plus for survival.  One big reason is that they are free and grow wild.  Second most people think they are weeds and ignore them.

Now trying to live off edible plants by themselves can be a big mistake.  See my post Living Off the Land and Foraging for Calories. This will tell you that to get enough calories to survive long term you need protein from things that move (animals, bugs etc.) or nuts.  However, this does not mean that edible plants are useless, they provide some calories, much needed nutrition, and variety in your diet.…

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Living Off the Land and Foraging for Calories.

Living off the landLiving off the land is an idea that is widely discussed in prepper circles.  I know people who plan to live of the land after TEOTWAWKI.  Fortunately, for most of them, they have never had to do it.  Living off the land is hard work and for most, it will be slow starvation.

An Australian study tells us that  hunter gatherers get 64% of their energy from things that move, 36% from plants, basically two thirds meat, fish or bug, one third plant. The creatures we eat are usually nutritionally dense and high in calories.  This does not hold true for plants.…

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Wild Jerusalem Artichokes are a Good Edible Plant

Potatoes aren’t the only good tuber out there, consider the Jerusalem artichoke also called the sunchoke, sunroot or earth apple.  This is actually a species of sunflower.  It grows wild in much of the United States and Canada.  It’s normally considered native to eastern North America, and found from eastern Canada and Maine west to North Dakota, and south to northern Florida and Texas.  While this is its natural range due to the influence of man, I have encountered it growing wild in Northern California and I would suspect it can show up in almost every state.

It is a herbaceous perennial plant growing from 4 ft 11 inches–9 ft 10 inches tall with leaves that have a rough, hairy texture and the larger leaves on the lower stem are broad and can be up to 12 inches long, and the higher leaves smaller and narrower. …

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Watercress a Good Edible Plant for Preppers

watercressWhen I was younger, my mother would serve watercress sandwiches on occasion.  They are a common English dish and are quite tasty.  I still like them and have a favorite spot for picking it located by an old spring several miles from my home, but still within walking distance.

Watercress is a fast growing, aquatic or semi-aquatic, perennial plant.  It is normally found growing in water or right on the edge of a stream, lake or spring.  It normally appears to be floating or creeping across the surface of the water.  Watercress leaves are made up of three to five oval-shaped leaflets and in the spring, has clusters of small flowers with, four white petals.…

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Wild Mustard Plants and Some of its Uses

The other day I received the following question on wild mustard which I am attempting to answer.

wild mustard

Hi! my name is Jeff and I am hoping that you will help me out. I live in the country where wild mustard is very abundant  and recently became curious about harvesting and making my own mustard. I have searched different sites and read much material about wild mustard. The problem I am having is that even though the sites are quite informative I am unable to find any information on when to harvest the plant. Are there different times to pick different parts of the plant for different uses?…

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Chrysanthemums  and Other Edible Flowers

edible flowers My wife likes to grow pretty flowers in the front yard and I have a tendency to think of that as a waste of time.  So we are working out a compromise and she is planting more flowers that are edible.  It is amazing the number of flowers that look good in your yard and are edible.  Here is a link to a list of common edible flowers, both wild and domestic.

She recently planted some Chrysanthemums, which are growing quite large and are edible.  Chrysanthemum greens have a slightly tangy taste and can be eaten raw or cooked.  The leaves are steamed or boiled and used as greens, in Chinese cuisine. …

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Purslane, A Common Edible Plant

Purslane, also known as duckweed, fatweed, pursley, pussley, verdolagas and wild portulaca while considered a weed in the United States, can be a good source of vitamins and minerals.  Purslane has fleshy succulent leaves and stems with small yellow flowers.  They look like small jade plants. The stems lay flat on the ground and radiate from a single taproot forming flat, circular mats up to 16 inches across.  The stems are often reddish at the base.

Purslane grows from the late spring to the start of fall.  Its succulent characteristic makes it very drought tolerant.  It grows wild across large parts of the United States. …

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Common Mallow, One of My Favorite Edible Plants

common mallow

Every year about this time I go crazy eating wild foods, the plants are everywhere.  One of my favorites is common mallow.  It grows all over and I love the taste of it raw.  As I walk down the hiking trails near my house, I often snack on it.

For some reason while I have written posts on many different wild plants, this is the first time I have posted anything about mallow.  Common mallow (Malva neglecta) is sometimes called buttonweed, cheeseplant, cheeseweed, dwarf mallow and roundleaf mallow. Although most people considered this plant a weed, it is an excellent green that can be eaten raw or cooked.…

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Sprouting Seeds is a Good Winter Source of Nutrition.

 

Spouting seeds is easy and during the fall and winter there are many of us that don’t eat enough greens. We eat vegetables with a meal and think we are getting enough, but we need more vitamins and minerals in the winter. Sprouting seeds is a quick way to have greens for smoothies, sandwiches, salads and toppings for soups There are many varieties of sprouting seeds, of course you may have a favorite one but try other varieties and you will be surprised at the taste.

Sprouting seeds increases the nutrition.  Studies show remarkable increases in levels of B Vitamins, as well as Vitamins C, E and A ( sometimes up to 15 times the original).…

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Cooking with Acorns is easy.

cooking with acorns

A while back, I wrote a couple of blogs on acorns and their uses.  These blogs included how to process them for eating.  Go to the following links to read them, Acorns  Uses of Acorns.  Today I want to add more information on cooking with acorns.  In my area, there are lots of acorns on the ground and they are ready to be picked up.

After you have leached the tannic acid out following the instruction from the above links, here are a couple of recipes you can try.  Since acorns do not have gluten, its flour will not make leaven bread without assistance.…

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