CAT tourniquet

The U.S Armies CAT Tourniquet

A while back I wrote a post on the different types of tourniquets that are currently available and some of their pro and cons, Tourniquets are an Essential Part of Any Good First Aid Kit. Since I wrote that article I have experimented with them and talked to some experienced medical personal.  Base on what I have found I am convinced that the best choice for a tourniquet is the U.S Army CAT tourniquet.  CAT stands for Combat Application Tourniquet.

The following is a Youtube video, that my granddaughter made showing how to use a CAT tourniquet.

As you saw in the video, the CAT tourniquet is easy to apply and will do the job.  It can be used one handed without any special training.  I would encourage you to play with one, when you first get them.  Even though it is simple, there is still a learning curve and a little practice builds confidence.

When you apply a CAT tourniquet, put pressure on until the bleeding stops or you can control it.  You don’t want to shut of all blood flow if you can help it.  Once the tourniquet is in place, leave it on until you get medical help.  Remember that a properly apply tourniquet will cause pain.

CAT Tourniquets are readily available on the internet for varying prices.  Just do a search and you will find them on sale from $14 to almost 50 dollars.  Try to avoid the ones that are made in China. Get ones that are made to US Military Specs, and preferably made in the U.S.  and don’t forget to practice.

Howard

3 thoughts on “The U.S Armies CAT Tourniquet”

  1. Talking to some medical folks I know they really need to know the exact time you applied the tourniquet, time of application greatly affects the type of follow up treatment they will need to perform. Notice the time label on the white part of the strap in the video, a sharpie writes perfect on white part of that strap.

  2. I don’t suggest attmepting to write on the small white strip. Tourniquet use should be written on the casualty’s forehead.

    The letter “T”, then a “-” and the time should be used. A permanent marker is best, but blood can be used as well. This is much easier to see, as the white strip will likely be covered in blood if there is such an injury that a tourniquet is required.

    Good post!

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