Automotive and metalworking hand tools every prepper should have.

metalworking hand tools

Ball peen hammers

Yesterday I posted a list of carpenter tools every prepper should have.  Today I am posting a list of automotive and metalworking hand tools.  Now this is just a basic list.  There are hundreds of other items that could be added to this list, including blacksmithing and more advanced motor repair tools.

The metalworking hand tools shown in this list are all tools that with a couple of exceptions would function without electric power.  If you had these tools combined with the ones on the list of carpentry tools, you would have the necessary tools to do most basic repairs and depending on your skill level, many advanced ones.

A list of metalworking hand tools

metalworking hand tools

Plumbers torch

  • Tin snips and shears for cutting sheet metal
  • A scribe for marking metal
  • Rulers or tapes
  • Dial calipers for measuring
  • Machinists square
  • Assorted center punches
  • Taps and dies
  • A set of easy outs for removing broken bolts
  • Hacksaws and a good supply of blades
  • Assorted channel locks
  • Cold chisels, several sizes
  • Ball and peen hammers, small and large
  • A good sturdy vise
  • A large anvil
  • Assorted metal files, flats, round and triangular
  • Assorted pliers, including long nosed
  • A hand drill with both wood and metal bits
  • Assorted open-end wrenches
  • Assorted sockets and ratchets 1/4 and 1/2 inch
  • Crescent wrenches 4 thru 12 inch
  • Vise grips, several
  • Allen wrench
  • Soft faced hammer of wooden mallet
  • Assorted screwdrivers, both flat head and phillips
  • Assorted pry bars
  • A plumber’s torch
  • Assorted pipe wrenches
  • Wire strippers
  • Wire cutters
  • Channel locks a couple of sizes
  • Timing light for older engines
  • Ohmmeter
  • Putty knife
  • Hand level, I forgot to put this in the list of carpentry tools
  • Clamps, good for both wood and metal work
  • A good US made hydraulic jack

Now there are two other tools that I wish to discuss that would be great to have on hand.  They are a drill press and a welder.  Drill presses have been around for many years and were powered by hand, water or other means.  They even used horses on occasion.  Hand powered ones are not to hard to find if you check barn sales, auctions and antique stores.  I have also seen them on ebay.

metalworking hand tools

An old acetylene welder powered by a calcium carbide generator

metalworking hand tools

Hand operated drill press

 

 

 

 

 

 

A friend of mine was still using an antique acetylene until just a few years ago.  It used calcium carbide to generate its own acetylene gas.  It worked well and calcium carbide can be stored long term as long as you keep it dry.  My friend has since passed and I am trying to get hold of his son to see what happened to it. Hopefully I can find it and get some good pictures.  Here is a link to information on calcium carbide generators.

If you know of any metalworking hand tools that I have missed, write and let us all know.

Howard

 

This entry was posted in tools and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Automotive and metalworking hand tools every prepper should have.

  1. Chuck Findlay says:

    You can stick weld with a few auto batteries “(check U-Tube)

    I chose to go with a MIG welder that I can run from a generator. But in a serious grid-down situation the generator may be short of gasoline.

    I generally don’t buy into the Mad Max / Patriots situation as a prediction of our future. I think we are going to go through tough times, but that the grid will still be there. It may suffer some blackouts, but I think it’s one thing that’s not going to be un-invented like so many prepper fiction books make out in their story line.

  2. Ken says:

    I’d recommend the following:
    1. double/bubble brake line flaring tool kit and tubing cutter
    2. decent OBDII/ABS/CAN scan tool
    3. one analog ohm meter
    4. one digital ohm meter
    5. a test light
    6. quality MAP gas torch and spare cylinders
    7. a 10 and 15 lb maul (sledge hammer)
    8. drift punches
    9. couple of brass punches
    10. 3/8 drive sockets and ratchets (metric and standard and the same for your 1/4 and 1/2 drive sockets and get both standard and deep well sockets in 6 point and 12 point) S-K Tools are Made in USA, some Sears Craftsmen mechanic tools are but more and more are made in China.
    11. socket extensions for your 1/4, 3/8 and 1/2 drive tools
    12. make sure you have wrenches that are both metric and standard sizes including your Allen or “hex” key wrenches
    13. Though not a “tool” such as you listed but are none the less very important are the factory service and repair manuals for all your equipment and vehicles, not Chilton or Haynes but factory. You can get them on Ebay or your local dealer. Chilton and Haynes are OK but don’t go into the detail the factory ones do.
    14. a spool of “mechanics wire”
    15. a good “bit set” such as this one http://www.tooltopia.com/astro-pneumatic-9448.aspx

    Did you mean “ratchets” instead of “racquets”? 😉

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *