Category Archives: edible plants

Plant These Edible Flowers in Your Garden Now

Plant These Edible Flowers in Your Garden Now via Preparedness Advice

The first edible flower I ever ate was a nasturtium. We had giant nasturtium plants growing in our herb garden, nearly taking over, in fact, and decided we would start consuming the orange and yellow blossoms and leaves. They have a peppery flavor with a little bit of a kick. It’s always fun to discover plants in your own backyard you can eat.

Nasturtiums aren’t the only edible flower that is commonly found in backyards and growing wild. Here is a list of some of the most common. This list is by no means complete, but is meant to be a starting point for further study of the flowers you have in your yard.…

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Free Manuals to Download on Survival and Edible Plants

 

Free Manuals to Download on Survival and Edible Plants via Preparedness Advice

Everybody likes to get something for free and here’s a huge collection of free manuals for you to download. I have not had a chance to review all of them so I can’t say that everything they suggest is accurate. Many of them are hundreds of pages long, so take your time reviewing them and making note of the books or pages in books that you may want to print out.

Urban Preparation Kit, Part 1, On Body Kit

Traps and Snares

Wilderness Survival Skills

Surviving Terrorism

Wilderness Survival

Survival Water Purification

Preserving Game Meats

Nuclear War Survival Skills

How to Build a Debris Hut

HHS Pandemic Influenza Plan

Combat Survival Evasion

Cold Weather Survival: A Way of Life

Cold Weather Survival

Camp Life in the Woods and the Tricks of Trapping and Trap Making

Alpine Living for SAR

Aids to Survival

Woodstravel

FM 21-76 US ARMY SURVIVAL MANUAL

Survival In Cold Weather Areas

Survival, Evasion and Recovery

NEWER US Army Survival Manual

Marines Individual Terrorism Survival

USMC Winter Survival Course

Wilderness Evasion: A Guide to Hiding Out and Eluding Pursuit in Remote Areas

USMC Summer Survival Course

Free Manuals on Edible & Medicinal Plants

WHO Monographs on Selected Medicinal Plants

WHO Monographs on Selected Medicinal Plants Volume 2

WHO Monographs on Selected Medicinal Plants Volume 3

WHO Monographs on Selected Medicinal Plants Volume 4

Useful Wild Plants of the United States and Canada

Survival Medicine

Survival: How to Make Herbal Preparations

Edible Medicinal Plants

Medicinal Plants in Folk Tradition

PDR for Herbal Medicines

Healing Pets With Alternative Medicine

Ethnobotany of the Forest Indians

Edible Wild Plants

Edible and Medicinal Plants

Plant Powers, Poisons, and Herb Craft

A Taste of Heritage: Crow Indian Recipes & Herbal Medicine

Common Edible Mushrooms — Be careful here.…

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How to Collect Pine Nuts

How to Collect Pine NutsDelicious and good for you

Here is a digger pine cone I picked up off the ground

The other day while out looking for edible plants, I came across some cones from the digger pines, also sometimes called gray pines. These cones were still intact and had not dropped their seeds, often called pine nuts.

I spent a bit of time and opened one.  The digger pines have one of the harder cones and you will need a hammer or a big rock to open them.  However, it is worth it you can get a good handful of nuts from one cone.…

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Some Examples of Edible Ornamental Flowers and How to Prepare Them

The other day I post an article on 82 different edible flowers  at that time I said that I would write further and explain how some of them can be used.  Here are three common edible ornamental flowers that you encounter all the time that can be eaten in an emergency. 

edible ornamental flower

Carnations

Carnations (Dianthus caryophyllus – also known as Dianthus) – The petals of carnations can be eaten either raw or cooked.  The flavor is slightly peppery and spicy.  Miniature carnations have a light clove or nutmeg taste.  You can use the carnation petals in salads or even cook them as a vegetable. …

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82 Common Edible Flowers

edible flowers

There are many guides to edible flowers available on the internet

Yesterday I posted an article on how to hide your gardens from prying eyes.  Part of the premise of the article was that today, many people cannot recognize one plant from another.  Most people have no idea that so many edible flowers exist.

Now before you run out and start eating the various flowers, you need to do a bit of study.  On many of these plants only parts of the plant are edible.  I suggest that as you plan your garden you research the various flowers and make sure that you know what parts of the plants are edible. …

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Cottonwood Trees are Useful for Preppers

cottonwood trees

The fibrous inner bark that is a good fire starter

I have some cottonwood trees growing on my property, including one that is almost dead.  This got me to wondering whether or not they had any good uses for preparedness.  I have always considered them kind of worthless trees, but after a bit of research I have changed my mind.

While they are not good firewood, they burn poorly because they are so fibrous.  But for many woodsmen, the cottonwood tree is a revered tree.

It is a good indicator of water.  Their roots seek out water and you will normally be able to find water near where they grow.  …

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Juniper Berries Another Useful Edible Plant

juniper berries

J communis common Juniper

It never ceases to amaze me as I continue to learn about the different plants that we have around us all the time and that are useful.  Today I am talking about the common Juniper plant. The ones you see in so many yards. I am sure you have all seen the juniper berries that grow on them.  But did you know that they are a common spice used in Northern European and Scandinavian food as a seasoning.

Juniper berries are used in meat dishes, especially wild birds and game meats including wild boar and venison. They are also used to season pork, cabbage, and sauerkraut dishes.…

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Tree Teas are a Good Source of Vitamin C

tree teas

Spruce trees

The other day I wrote a blog on Pine Trees, How to Eat One. In the article, I discuss making tea from pine needles. This is a tea that is heavy with vitamin C and the pine has other uses as well.

One thing that was pointed out was that certain types of pine tree (Ponderosa, Norfolk Island and Yew) have some toxic properties and you should not make tea from them. As a result of this article, I received emails asking about other types of trees and if you could make tree teas from their needles or leaves.…

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Pine Trees, How to Eat One

pine trees

A white pine

A few years back I talked with a Korean who told me that during the Korean War they ate pine bark when food was in short supply.  It kept them alive, when times were tough.  Now eating pine trees has not been high on my list of things to do, but I have eaten pine nuts and drank pine needle tea in the past.

Lets look at what is edible on pine trees

First pine nuts, just about everybody has eaten these and knows how good they taste.  Here is a link to a previous article I wrote on How to collect Pine Nuts. …

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Cow Parsnip a Useful Edible Plant

cow parsnipHeracleum maximum commonly known as cow parsnip (also known as Indian celery, Indian rhubarb or pushki) is a plant that is Native to North America.  Cow parsnip is distributed throughout most of the continental United States except the Gulf coast.  It occurs from sea level to about 9000 ft, and is especially prevalent in Alaska.

I have debated with myself about whether or not to write about this plant.  There are two problems with this plant.  One it closely resembles Poison Hemlock, Water Hemlock and Bulbiferous Hemlock and Giant Hogweed.  All parts of these plants are extremely poisonous.  Second,  Cow parsnip juices contain a phototoxin that acts on contact with skin and is triggered by exposure to ultraviolet light.…

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