Make your own deep well bucket

A simple method for getting water out of a deep well without electricity is shown below.

Attach a rope to the PVC pipe and lower the bucket down the 4 to 6 inch well shaft, and let it sink into the water.  The rubber flapper will act like a foot valve and rise up against the wires when it hits the water.  This will allow the water to enter the pipe.  When you start to pull it up, the weight of the water will push the rubber flapper down against the reducer and seal the bottom of the bucket.

Howard

 

 

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11 Responses to Make your own deep well bucket

  1. Matt in Oklahoma says:

    Excellent design. I have a question, I’m new to this subject and I don’t understand why the water won’t just fill over the top of the pvc pipe if it is weighted enough to take it below the water line when dropped down.
    I have some time off soon and I’m gonna try and build one of these and test it.

  2. admin says:

    If you put enough weight in you could get it to sink, but remember you have to pull that extra weight up.
    Howard

  3. Matt in Oklahoma says:

    Passed this around to some folks today, good info

  4. Ron Mauer says:

    This is an improvement over the buckets I’ve been making http://ronmauer.net/blog/?page_id=178. That version uses a more fragile check valve and more parts. Thanks for posting. This is a better and simpler design.

    • Noel says:

      MB Right, good question. If you have a gas leak you need to turn your gas off baeucse a spark could create an explosion, or start a fire. In an emergency, gas lines are easily damaged. Think of an earthquake, for example; older gas lines are often rigid, and the shaking can cause them to break. In a case like that, it would be really important that you shut off your gas until someone can come fix the problem. Turning your gas off (if you need to) is an important way to keep a smaller emergency from becoming a bigger emergency. Sometimes gas leaks occur without another emergency if you have an old furnace it may malfunction in some way that causes it to leak gas but these sorts of problems are less common.

  5. Anonymous says:

    can’t you just use a pitcher pump?

  6. Clay says:

    Thanks for all your info! But I can’t find a 2-1 1/4 reducer anywhere. Best I’ve found so far is 2-1 1/2 – would that work, or could you tell me where to get the right one? Seems like this should be the easy part.

  7. admin says:

    Any size will work as long as the rubber flapper won’t fall through.
    Howard

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