Survival Bicycles Can be a Good Idea

survival bycycles

Supplies being moved down the Ho Chi Minh trail on bicycles. Notice the modification to the bike handles

In today’s society, I see large numbers of bicyclists riding around every weekend when the weather is nice.  They are all wearing the tight bright colored outfits that seem to be mandatory for bike riders today.  I remember when we rode around in our jeans or whatever.  Now I will admit that bikes today are an improvement over what we had. so I have been giving some thought to building a survival bicycle.

My bicycle riding days are long past, although I have been giving some thought to starting again and I even have a couple of bikes.  So I am no expert.  But I do have a few thoughts.  Remember the Vietnamese pushed bicycles with one or two hundred pounds of supplies south down the Ho Chi Minh trail, unloaded the supplies and rode the bicycles back north.  This could be a great way for your family to move a significant amount of supplies if you have to bug out.

With a little preplanning, you could figure out the best way to load your survival bicycles so that they are correctly balanced to make it easier to keep them in an upright position.  Make sure that your packs or saddlebags can be easily and quickly attached to the bikes.  This is true whether you plan to push them with a heavy load or to ride them.

If you are a dedicated rider, you will know more about what to do than me, but if not, here are a few suggestions.  Check the general condition of the bike.  Look for the obvious things like the condition of the tires.  Make sure that the seat is comfortable to set on.  Don’t laugh if you’re riding a long distance it can get darn uncomfortable.

It may pay to take your bike to a bike repair shop and have it serviced and see if they will let you watch so that you have the opportunity to learn.

Think about getting extra parts you need.  Keep a supply handy of tires, tubes, repair kits, a tire pump and a good set of tools.  Store the required lubricates.

How about one of those kiddie carriers you use to pull your little ones or grandkids.  They can be used to carry all kinds of things.  I have been seeing more of the three-wheeled bicycles with baskets on the streets near where we live.  For some of us these could make great survival bicycles.

Survival Bicycles

Here is a cart you can pull behind your bike

ho chi minh trail

 

 

 

 

 

Here is a link to a previous post written by someone with more knowledge than I. A case for the bicycle as a survival vehicle  FYI I am always willing to post articles submitted by readers.

survival bicycles

Here is a finished survival bicycle

 

If you don’t have a bike, don’t forget to look at garage sales.  We are all trying to save money so look in your sheds, garage or junk pile.  This could be a good family project.  Getting your children young or old to help will familiarize them with bike maintenance.

If you haven’t ridden your bike, in years get going and practice.  Whether you are using your bike for daily transportation or as survival bike, it can be a very useful tool.

Howard

This entry was posted in Transportation and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to Survival Bicycles Can be a Good Idea

  1. jay says:

    I’m looking at the kiddie carrier with a new point of view (for me). I have large dogs, and some people use dogs (draft dogs) to pull carts. They can pull huge loads, hundreds of pounds. I’ve always wanted to try it but the carts are a little expensive. However, I bet this could be rigged to do the same thing. hhmmm, I wonder….

  2. mikeinsa says:

    McMaster-Carr sells a “shop bike”

    AtomicZombie has plans to build a trike.

    Which ever one you choose, get Schalbe “Marathon Tour Plus” trires. They are heavy, pricey and long lasting. They will be there long after you’ve reached your expiration date.

    You may find a light weight yard trailer that can be refitted with bike tires. A larger diameter tire will roll easier.

  3. C9 Skills Group says:

    Great posting. I’m 52 and just got back into bike riding with my 12 year old. Took a few weeks to get the kinks worked out of the muscles I had forgotten about. But I have to say I feel much better and the pains are slowly going away. We’ve even started a local group called BugOut Bicycling where we are teaching bicycle repair and different life skills (wilderness / urban skills). Keep up the great job with the blog. This is something else we are learning to! Best Regards, Jude C9 Skills Group – Louisiana, USA

  4. Deserthawk says:

    Here is a good example of a well thought out survival mountain cargo bike http://lucerobnett.com/bike-named-sal/
    This has onboard electronic device charging ability, water purification and a maximum cargo load limit of 250 pounds.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *