Why You Should Rotate Food

You can see how bad 12 year old cans of tomatoes can deteriorate.

You can see how bad 12 year old cans of tomatoes can deteriorate.

Yesterday a friend provided me with some pictures she took in her food storage area.  She has quite a bit of food stored but has not been keeping up with rotating the food.  The other day she found three cases of canned tomato that had been stored since before Y2K. They had been stored behind other items and forgotten about.  Even though they had been kept cool and protected from the elements, the cans had rusted through.

Most of the cans had leaked and the contents had evaporated.  There was one or two that were still intact.  I have one and intend to open it but will not make a taste test.  Surprisingly enough the can I have is not swollen.  In all the cans I have seen fail, tomatoes seems to be the most common contents.  The shelve life of tomatoes should be considered shorter than most other products.   Remember to rotate your foods.

You can see how bad 12 year old cans of tomatoes can deteriorate.

A second look

Howard

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5 Responses to Why You Should Rotate Food

  1. Ellen says:

    Well if I had been left on a shelf since Y2K I would have rusted too.
    Yes, we need to rotate, rotate, rotate.
    Watch juice cans too. I had one leak and it was in my cupboard way less than Y2K.

  2. Matt in Oklahoma says:

    Is that because of the acid content in the tomatoes?

  3. admin says:

    Matt
    That is what I think.
    Howard

  4. A veteran who is preparing says:

    Every January we sit down and go through all our stored foods. Anything with a “Best Buy Date” of that year gets pulled and set aside. So last month everything with a date of 2012 was pulled. We also check the condition of every can and container, any that are degrading/rusting gets pulled also. Those cans are then replaced on a one for one basis. We get replacements at the store/etc. and then replace a 2012 can with a new can, with the 2012 can then put in the kitchen pantry for use this year. It helps to have the dates listed in your inventory lists so you have a little bit of an idea of how many you will have to replace before you do the rotation. I want to add an additional “condition inspection” in June or July (but we are usually too busy during the summer months).

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